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and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
you're here. from the aba science and technology section, and a be a public law section. i'd like to get a special thanks to john harrington for pulling this together, to william black for is working this panel, and the aba international section for putting on this terrific program, a topic that i consider to be one of the biggest, scariest topics of our time. for those of you that are familiar with this topic, you may share some of my sentiments. i'm reluctant to say this on the public record, but quite frankly i'm terrified. and i trust at the end of this you will be as well. the first time that a realize that cyberwar and terrorism was a hot topic was when the national research council put out to scholarly publications on cyberwar, while at the same time "vanity fair" had cyberwar on the front page along with our best friends the british royals, kate and we'll. that tells you we're covering both ends of the spectrum. as we know, the director of national intelligence, mike mcconnell, famously said, we would lose a cyberwar if it took place. i think the canadians would win but i'
and more of them. we keep pulling the resources out. is where technology can be really an important and powerful vehicle. i think initially we had to vent -- said several minutes of these people and we have data at about 50,000. i think they've done a lot, put up huge effort trying to improve that. >> we are at a time in the administration, the second term of the administration were question of legacy often comes into play. people start talking about what will this administration be remembered for. so i kind of wonder what you, if you have the opportunity, which he did when you're were in office, at least two of the dead and maybe the others had the opportunity, if this president and the secretary of state, a 20 minute conversation about public diplomacy and what could be done that was particularly useful to leave something behind for years from now, what would be, what kind of things would you bring up? just to give you time to think about, let me remind, the bush administration under secretary glassman together with microsoft and a bunch of other people put together a conference o
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